FMP: Research – Facts and Figures 360MC

As I mentioned in a previous post, when looking at Mental Health Week and awareness I found some useful links that help with my reasoning for making this film.

Here’s what I found:

‘The facts and figures around Mental Health in the UK are alarming.’

  • 1 in 4 people will experience some kind of mental health problem in the course of a year

    1 in 4 British adults experience at least one diagnosable mental health problem in any one year, and 1 in 6 experiences this at any given time. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

    Although mental disorders are widespread, serious cases are concentrated among a relatively small proportion of people who experience more than one mental health problem. (The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2005)

    It is estimated that approximately 450 million people worldwide have a mental health problem.  (World Health Organisation, 2001)

  • Mixed anxiety and depression is the most common mental disorder in Britain

    Mixed anxiety & depression is the most common mental disorder in Britain, with almost 9% of people meeting criteria for diagnosis. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

    Between 8-12% of the population experience depression in any year. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

    About half of people with common mental health problems are no longer affected after 18 months, but poorer people, the long-term sick and unemployed people are more likely to be still affected than the general population.  (Better Or Worse: A Longitudinal Study Of The Mental Health Of Adults In Great Britain, National Statistics, 2003)

  • ‘Women are more likely to have been treated for a mental health problem than men’

    Women are more likely to have been treated for a mental health problem than men (29% compared to 17%).This could be because, when asked, women are more likely to report symptoms of common mental health problems. (Better Or Worse: A Longitudinal Study Of The Mental Health Of Adults In Great Britain, National Statistics, 2003)

    Depression is more common in women than men. 1 in 4 women will require treatment for depression at some time, compared to 1 in 10 men. The reasons for this are unclear, but are thought to be due to both social and biological factors. It has also been suggested that depression in men may have been under diagnosed because they present to their GP with different symptoms.  (National Institute For Clinical Excellence, 2003)

    Women are twice as likely to experience anxiety as men. Of people withphobias or OCD, about 60% are female.  (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

    Men are more likely than women to have an alcohol or drug problem. 67% of British people who consume alcohol at ‘hazardous’ levels, and 80% of those dependent on alcohol are male. Almost three quarters of people dependent on cannabis and 69% of those dependent on other illegal drugs are male. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

  • ‘About 10% of children have a mental health problem at any one time’

    One in ten children between the ages of one and 15 has a mental health disorder. (The Office for National Statistics Mental health in children and young people in Great Britain, 2005)

    Estimates vary, but research suggests that 20% of children have a mental health problem in any given year, and about 10% at any one time.  (Lifetime Impacts: Childhood and Adolescent Mental Health, Understanding The Lifetime Impacts, Mental Health Foundation, 2005)

    Rates of mental health problems among children increase as they reach adolescence. Disorders affect 10.4% of boys aged 5-10, rising to 12.8% of boys aged 11-15, and 5.9% of girls aged 5-10, rising to 9.65% of girls aged 11-15. (Mental Disorder More Common In Boys, National Statistics Online, 2004)

  • ‘Depression affects 1 in 5 older people’

    Depression affects 1 in 5 older people living in the community and 2 in 5 living in care homes. (Adults In Later Life with Mental Health Problems, Mental Health Foundation quoting Psychiatry in the Elderly, 3rd edition,Oxford University Press, 2002)

    Dementia affects 5% of people over the age of 65 and 20% of those over 80. (National Institute For Clinical Excellence, 2004)

    About 700,000 people in the UK have dementia (1.2% of the population) at any one time. (National Institute For Clinical Excellence, 2004)

  • ‘Suicides rates show that British men are three times as likely to die by suicide than British women’

    Suicide remains the most common cause of death in men under the age of 35 (Five Years On, Department Of Health, 2005).

    More than 5700 people in the UK died by suicide in 2010 (Samaritans Information Resource Pack, 2012).

    British men are three times as likely as British women to die by suicide (Samaritans Information Resource Pack, 2004).

    The suicide rate among people over 65 has fallen by 24% in recent years, but is still high compared to the population overall. (Samaritans Information Resource Pack, 2004).

  • ‘Self-harm statistics for the UK show one of the highest rates in Europe: 400 per 100,000 population’

    The UK has one of the highest rates of self-harm in Europe, at 400 per 100,000 population. (Self-poisoning and self-injury in adults, Clinical Medicine, 2002)

    People with current mental health problems are 20 times more likely than others to report having harmed themselves in the past. (National Collaborating Centre For Mental Health)

  • ‘Only 1 in 10 prisoners has no mental disorder’

    More than 70% of the prison population has two or more mental health disorders. (Social Exclusion Unit, 2004, quoting Psychiatric Morbidity Among Prisoners In England And Wales, 1998)

    Male prisoners are 14 times more likely to have two or more disorders than men in general, and female prisoners are 35 times more likely than womenin general. (Social Exclusion Unit, 2004, quoting Psychiatric Morbidity Among Prisoners In England And Wales, 1998)

    The suicide rate in prisons is almost 15 times higher than in the general population: in 2002 the rate was 143 per 100,000 compared to 9 per 100,000 in the general population. (The National Service Framework For Mental Health: Five Years On, Department of Health, 2004; Samaritans Information Resource Pack, 2004)

These are the ones I found most shocking and interesting:

*1 in 4 British adults experience at least one diagnosable mental health problem in any one year, and 1 in 6 experiences this at any given time. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

*It is estimated that approximately 450 million people worldwide have a mental health problem.  (World Health Organisation, 2001)

*Between 8-12% of the population experience depression in any year. (The Office for National Statistics Psychiatric Morbidity report, 2001)

*Estimates vary, but research suggests that 20% of children have a mental health problem in any given year, and about 10% at any one time.  (Lifetime Impacts: Childhood and Adolescent Mental Health, Understanding The Lifetime Impacts, Mental Health Foundation, 2005)

*More than 5700 people in the UK died by suicide in 2010 (Samaritans Information Resource Pack, 2012).

*The UK has one of the highest rates of self-harm in Europe, at 400 per 100,000 population. (Self-poisoning and self-injury in adults, Clinical Medicine, 2002)

 

I also found from the topics that are covered by my participant:

– Alcohol;
Mental health problems not only result from drinking too much alcohol. They can also cause people to drink too much.

– Anxiety;
With anxiety, you may have some of the above feelings as well as longer-term effects, such as:

  • a more nagging sense of fear
  • irritability
  • trouble sleeping
  • headaches
  • trouble getting on with work and planning for the future
  • problems having sex
  • loss of self-confidence.

Fear and anxiety can last for a short time and then pass. But they can also last much longer and you can get stuck with them. In some cases they can take over your life. They can affect your appetite, sleep and concentration. They can stop people travelling, going to work or school, or even leaving the house.

– Bi-polar disorder;
In the high phase (also referred to as hypomania), someone with bi-polar disorder may have huge amounts of energy and feel little need for sleep. You may think and talk faster than usual, and your thoughts may jump rapidly from one subject to another, making conversation difficult. You may also have what are called ‘grandiose’ ideas or delusions about your abilities and powers, and a loss of judgement. People in a high phase can get themselves into all sorts of difficulties that they would normally avoid – they may leave their job, spend money they don’t have, or give away all their possessions.

In a low (or depressive) phase, people feel hopeless, despairing and lethargic, become full of self-blame and self-doubt and have difficulty concentrating. This can make it difficult to cope with everyday life. You may want to withdraw from friends and social contacts, and may feel suicidal.

– Bulimia Nervosa;
People with bulimia nervosa can’t stick to a healthy eating pattern. They tend to binge, that is, eat a lot at once. This makes them feel guilty and out of control so they then panic and punish themselves by starving, making themselves sick, taking laxatives or over-exercising. This can lead to a number of physical problems including tooth decay, constipation and intestinal damage, as well as heart and kidney disease. Telltale signs of bulimia nervosa include making excuses to avoid eating in company or rushing to the lavatory after a meal.

– Depression;
Depression is a common mental disorder that causes people to experience depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, low energy, and poor concentration.

Depression is different from feeling down or sad. Unhappiness is something which everyone feels at one time or another, usually due to a particular cause. A person suffering from depression will experience intense emotions of anxiety, hopelessness, negativity and helplessness, and the feelings stay with them instead of going away.

– Drugs;
There are many reasons why you may start to use any of these substances. You may begin because of curiosity, rebellion, or influence from peers. You may find the experience enjoyable and want to repeat it. It may start when you are unhappy or stressed or trying to cope with problems in your life. Drugs, alcohol, nicotine, solvents and even food can start as ‘props’ to help you get through difficult times. But the feelings of relief are only temporary and, as the problems don’t disappear, you may use more and more of these substances and risk becoming dependent on them – which in itself creates new problems.

– Friendship;
If a friend no longer contacts you, it’s understandable to feel rejected, but you are not responsible for other people’s reaction to your problems. If one person ends your friendship, it doesn’t mean that others will do the same.

If you are the friend of someone experiencing mental health problems who seems to be withdrawing from your friendship, try to understand what your friend may be going through. Their difficulties may be only temporary. Give them the space they need and make sure they know how they can contact you at a later date if they decide to get back in touch.

– Hearing Voices;
Hearing voices can be a very disturbing experience, both for the person who hears voices and family and friends. Until recently voices were regarded as a symptom of a mental illness and not talked about because of fear of stigma.

Hearing voices are still considered by psychiatry as an auditory hallucination and as a symptom of conditions such as schizophrenic disorders, manic depression and psychosis. The orthodox treatment is with major tranquillisers. These do not get rid of the voices.

– Insomnia;
Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder, affecting an estimated 20% of people.

Typical symptoms are:

  • problems falling asleep
  • problems staying asleep (so that you wake up several times each night)
  • waking up too early
  • daytime sleepiness, anxiety, impaired concentration and memory and irritability

Short-term insomnia, lasting for a few nights or a few weeks, generally affects people who are temporarily experiencing one or more of the following:

  • stress
  • change in environmental noise levels
  • extreme change in temperature
  • a different routine, perhaps due to jet lag
  • side effects from medicines

Chronic insomnia, lasting for a month or longer, often results from a combination of factors that sometimes include underlying physical or mental health problems. It can also be due to behavioural factors such as too much caffeine or alcohol or a long-term disruption to your routine such as shift work.

– Medication for mental health;
For some people, drugs are a short-term solution used to get them over an immediate crisis. For other people, drugs are an ongoing, long-term treatment that enables them to live with severe and enduring mental health problems. Many people do not want to stay on medication for years, but it can help some people to lead the kind of lives they want to lead, without relapses and re-admissions to hospital.

– Panic attacks;
Someone having a panic attack experiences a sudden and intense sensation of fear. They may feel they have lost control and feel desperate to get out of the situation that has triggered their anxiety. Symptoms of panic attack include:

  • rapid breathing
  • feeling breathless
  • sweating
  • feeling very hot or cold
  • feeling sick
  • feeling faint or dizzy
  • tingling fingers
  • shivering or shaking
  • racing heart or irregular heartbeat (palpitations).

The problem may get worse if over-breathing sets in because this triggers sensations such as confusion, cramps, pains and feelings of weakness. The symptoms of a severe panic attack can be quite similar to a heart attack and someone experiencing one may be convinced they are going to die.

– Paranoia;
People with paranoia are prone to delusions including morbid suspicion, persecution beliefs, or ideas of grandeur.

Paranoia may occur as one of the symptoms of a number of other mental health problems including severe anxiety, depression, bi-polar disorder,schizophrenia and some forms of personality disorder.

– Psychosis;
Psychosis describes the distortion of a person’s perception of reality, often accompanied by delusions (irrational and unfounded beliefs) and/or hallucinations (seeing, hearing, smelling, sensing things that other people can’t).

Psychosis is a symptom of some of the more severe forms of mental health problems, such as bi-polar disorder, schizophrenia, substance abuse or some forms of personality disorder.

– Self harm;
Self-harm describes a wide range of things that people do to themselves in a deliberate and usually hidden way. In the vast majority of cases self-harm remains a secretive behaviour that can go on for a long time without being discovered.

Self-harm is a symptom of underlying mental or emotional distress. Young people who self-harm mainly do so because they find it helps relieve distressing feelings and helps them cope with problems in their lives. It is rarely about trying to end their life.

A wide range of factors may be involved. Very often there are multiple triggers, or daily stresses, rather than one significant change or event. Factors can include:

  • feeling isolated
  • academic pressures
  • suicide or self-harm by someone close to the young person
  • family problems, including parental separation or divorce
  • being bullied
  • low self-esteem.

– Suicide;
Certain factors are known to be associated with increased risk of suicide. These include:

  • drug and alcohol misuse
  • unemployment
  • social isolation
  • poverty
  • poor social conditions
  • imprisonment
  • violence
  • family breakdown.

People with a diagnosed mental health condition are at particular risk. Around 90% of suicide victims suffer from a psychiatric disorder at the time of their death.

Those at the highest risk of suicide are people suffering from alcoholism, clinical depression or schizophrenia. Previous suicide attempts are also an indication of particular risk. Up to 20% of survivors try again within a year, and as a group they are 100 times more likely to go on to complete suicide than those who have never attempted suicide.

For young people, bullying, family turmoil, mental health problems, unemployment and a family history of suicide can play a part in increasing the risk of suicide. Amongst the young, 80% of suicides are male, and one in three young people who take their lives are intoxicated at the time of death.

Although I am a first hand witness to my participant’s mental illness, without researching and reading through this information I would not have known the full extent to which each part she has described and told me about previously, had really meant. I also wouldn’t have known just how common mental illness among people are and especially in the UK. This has very clearly enhanced my learning, knowledge and understanding of mental illnesses.

 

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About gailenepierre

Ambitious and driven but knows how to have funnnn :)

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